FROM AUSTRALIA - NEWS IN BRIEF

Australians will have to get used to drinking recycled water

Sheikh Abdel Aziem Al-Afifi has been announced as the new Mufti of

Australia.

Stop relying on Chinese international students, ASEAN countries say to

Australia

$47 Million to Support Recycling in NSW

Driverless future on Sydney's horizon




Australians will have to get used to drinking recycled water

24/3/018

Translation appears in Arabic section.

Sydney: Drinking treated sewage has always been on the nose in Australia.

The "ick" factor has led successive state governments across the country to rule it out as an option and was a key reason desalination plants were built in many capital cities.

But you're going to have to get over it because once population booms and climate change bites, most Australians will be drinking recycled water, according to urban water experts.

"I believe it will happen in the next decade for one of our capital cities on the east coast," Water Services Association of Australia executive director Adam Lovell said.

For people living in inland regional cities like Goulburn and Canberra, where desalination plants aren't an option, it could be even sooner.

 Image result for Sheikh Abdel Aziem Al-Afifi has been announced as the new Mufti of Australia.

Sheikh Abdel Aziem Al-Afifi has been announced as the new Mufti of Australia.

Sydney: Following their 11th general assembly meeting, The Australian National Imams Council held an election for the position of Mufti of Australia. This comes as result of the previous Mufti, Dr. Ibrahim Abu Mohamad, completing the maximum constitutionally permitted two full terms of six years.

The Australian National Imams Council Executive Committee which comprises of 18 eminent Imams from different states in Australia, elected Imam Abdel Aziem Al-Afifi as the new Mufti of Australia for a three-year session.

The Victorian-based Sheikh Al-Afifi served as the president of the Australian National Imams Council (ANIC) for two terms from 2010-2015. Born in Egypt, he graduated with a degree in Islamic studies. Al-Afifi also holds a masters degree in Quranic recitations. Sheikh Abdel Aziem arrived in Australia in the year 2000 where he served numerous Islamic Societies and schools.

In a Press Release issued on Sunday 18th of March, 2018, The Australian National Imams Council emphasized that they are the official Islamic religious authority recognised by the Australian government, hence, any other party claiming the role of Mufti is false and has no basis.

 Image result for Stop relying on Chinese international students, ASEAN countries say to Australia

Stop relying on Chinese international students, ASEAN countries say to Australia

Malaysia: Calls for Australia to stop relying so heavily on Chinese international students and start looking to its neighbours for students which was discussed at an ASEAN education meeting in Malaysia.

Education is Australia's third largest export, and according to the federal Department of Education and Training, some 800,000 students came to study in 2017 alone, including at both school and higher education institutions.

"One of the key topics is how Australia can switch from its focus on China towards ASEAN member countries," Director of the ASEAN Focus Group Michael Fay said

"For some of the Australian universities, 40 per cent of their international students come from China.

 Image result for $47 Million to Support Recycling in NSW

$47 Million to Support Recycling in NSW

Sydney: The NSW Government will release a one-off package of up to $47 million to support local government and industry to respond to China’s National Sword policy, Environment Minister Gabrielle Upton announced.

“NSW has a strong kerbside recycling system and the Government, councils and recycling industry are committed to working together to ensure it continues,” Ms Upton said.

The one-off package responds to China’s enforcement of its National Sword policy which restricts the types of recycled material China will accept.

 Image result for Driverless future on Sydney's horizon

Driverless future on Sydney's horizon

Sydney: Automated cars are taking to Sydney's roads with the NSW government giving the nod to extensive testing of the new technology.

The state government announced on Tuesday it was working with motorway operator Transurban as well as car manufacturers to develop the automated technology.

A NSW trial, which began, will run until October on the Sydney orbital network including the Lane Cove Tunnel, The Hills M2 Motorway, Westlink M7, the M5 and the Eastern Distributor.


 














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