FROM AUSTRALIA - NEWS IN BRIEF

Broccoli coffee could lead to improved diets while helping farmers cut waste

Tracking the smugglers' trail of priceless Islamic State loot to art markets in the West

Labor Welcomes Berejiklian Government Finally Adopting its Position on Hate Speech

Tonsil surgery might put kids at greater risk of chest bugs: study

Widespread bullying of disabled students includes assaults and suicide taunts

Commonwealth Bank to pay $700 million fine for anti-money laundering




Broccoli coffee could lead to improved diets while helping farmers cut waste

9/6/2018                        

(Translation appears in Arabic section)

Sydney - M. E. Times Int'l: Beetroot, coconut, turmeric and blue algae have all had their turn as the 'it' coffee additive, but now the national science agency says its time for broccoli to take centre stage.

CSIRO researchers hope a powdered form of the brassica will not only make its way into your flat white, but also a whole range of snack foods and meals.

 Image result for Broccoli coffee could lead to improved diets while helping farmers cut waste

Broccoli is recognised as a nutrient-rich vegetable, with plenty of fibre, vitamins A, B1 and B6, potassium, zinc and magnesium, among others.

"Two tablespoons of broccoli powder is equivalent to one serve of vegetables," CSIRO food scientist Maryann Augustin said.

                Image result for Tracking the smugglers' trail of priceless Islamic State loot to art markets in the West       

Tracking the smugglers' trail of priceless Islamic State loot to art markets in the West

USA: Authorities in the United States and Europe are uncovering growing evidence that priceless antiquities looted by Islamic State (IS) terrorists — including works from war-torn Syria — are being smuggled into Western art markets.

In recent weeks investigators in the US, Spain and Italy have made arrests, or moved to seize antiquities believed to have been plundered from historical sites in Syria, Libya and Egypt.

The US Attorney's Office in California alleges the mosaic — weighing nearly a ton and measuring 5.5 x 2.5 metres, dates as far back as the third century and was likely stolen from Syria and smuggled to the US via Turkey.

It alleges Mohamad Yassin Alcharihi had illegally concealed the mosaic in his garage in California.

 Image result for Labor Welcomes Berejiklian Government Finally Adopting its Position on Hate Speech

Labor Welcomes Berejiklian Government Finally Adopting its Position on Hate Speech

Sydney: NSW Opposition Leader Luke Foley has welcomed the news that the State Government has finally acted on Labor’s call to strengthen laws against hate speech but has lamented how long it has taken to act.

Five years ago the Liberal-National government said it was a priority but had done nothing to change laws until today.

Its inaction had empowered racist groups to spread vile racist propaganda knowing that a prosecution was highly unlikely.

Labor introduced legislation into the Parliament in 2016 to make advocating threatening or inciting physical harm an offence under the Crimes Act 1990 but the Government voted it down in the Legislative Assembly 48 votes to 31. A subsequent bill was introduced earlier this year. Mr Foley promised to bring in new laws in the first 100 days of an incoming Labor government.

             

Image result for Tonsil surgery might put kids at greater risk of chest bugs: study

  

    

    

Tonsil surgery might put kids at greater risk of chest bugs: study

Sydney: Could having your tonsils or adenoids out as a child mean you are more likely to get respiratory infections as an adult? A large international study says yes.

The research has found children who have their tonsils or adenoids removed are up to three times more likely to contract respiratory diseases when they get older.

Researchers from the University of Melbourne looked at more than 1 million children under nine from Denmark who had the procedures, then followed them up until the age of 30.

Lead researcher Dr Sean Byars from the University of Melbourne said tonsils and adenoids played an important role in immune function, but until now there had been little research into the risks in later life of removing the organs.

Australian doctors said the findings would need to be replicated in other studies, to prove having tonsils or adenoids removed caused health problems in later life.

Professor Michael Abramson from Monash University said the study was observational, rather than definitive proof.

"The results of this study provide important information for surgeons and referring doctors to discuss with parents," he said.

 Image result for Widespread bullying of disabled students includes assaults and suicide taunts

Widespread bullying of disabled students includes assaults and suicide taunts

Sydney: More than 56 per cent of students with disabilities had experienced bullying over a 12-month period, a national survey has found.

The survey, by Children and Young People with Disability Australia, revealed students experienced a range of bullying including being punched, kicked, headbutted, cyberbullied, spat on and having food or rocks thrown at them. Some had been told to take their own lives.

The chief executive of Children and Young People with Disability Australia, Stephanie Gotlib, said the bullying could have ongoing negative impacts on the targeted students.

Ms Gotlib said major reforms in the education system were needed.

"I think the whole thing is snowballing and it's really now at a crisis where there is a critical and urgent need for reform for students with a disability.

 Image result for Commonwealth Bank to pay $700 million fine for anti-money laundering

Commonwealth Bank to pay $700 million fine for anti-money laundering

Canberra: The Commonwealth Bank has agreed to pay a $700 million fine in relation to breaches of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws.

The Federal Government's financial intelligence agency AUSTRAC had accused the bank of serious and systemic breaches of the laws last year.

As part of the settlement, CBA has admitted to the late filing of 53,506 reports of transactions above $10,000 through its "intelligent deposit machines" (IDMs).

For a period of three years, the bank also did not comply with the requirements of its AML/CTF (anti-money laundering/counter-terrorism financing) program relating to monitoring transactions on 778,370 accounts.


 












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